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A Delicate Touch

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

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Otobong Nkanga

House Boy, 2004

Watercolor, ink and acrylic on paper

Promised Gift of Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg
 

Otobong Nkanga
House Us Three, 2004
Watercolor, ink and acrylic on paper, 9 x 14 in.
Gift of Wim Van Dongen, Antwerp, Belgium 08.19.1

Otobong Nkanga

House Planning, 2004

Watercolor, ink and acrylic on paper, 9 x 14 in.

Promised Gift of Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg

Otobong Nkanga

Perfect Measures with Blood Stain, 2002

Watercolor, ink and acrylic on paper, 9 x 14 in.

Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee

Wangechi Mutu
Untitled - pinup series, 2001
Watercolor and collage on paper, 10 x 13 in.
Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 02.8.5
Wangechi Mutu
Untitled - pinup series, 2001
Watercolor and collage on paper, 10 x 13 in.
Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 02.8.3
Wangechi Mutu
Untitled - pinup series, 2001
Watercolor and collage on paper, 10 x 13 in.
Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 02.8.2

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Otobong Nkanga

House Boy, 2004

Watercolor, ink and acrylic on paper

Promised Gift of Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg
 

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Otobong Nkanga
House Us Three, 2004
Watercolor, ink and acrylic on paper, 9 x 14 in.
Gift of Wim Van Dongen, Antwerp, Belgium 08.19.1

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Otobong Nkanga

House Planning, 2004

Watercolor, ink and acrylic on paper, 9 x 14 in.

Promised Gift of Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Otobong Nkanga

Perfect Measures with Blood Stain, 2002

Watercolor, ink and acrylic on paper, 9 x 14 in.

Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Wangechi Mutu
Untitled - pinup series, 2001
Watercolor and collage on paper, 10 x 13 in.
Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 02.8.5

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Wangechi Mutu
Untitled - pinup series, 2001
Watercolor and collage on paper, 10 x 13 in.
Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 02.8.3

Watercolors from the Permanent Collection

Wangechi Mutu
Untitled - pinup series, 2001
Watercolor and collage on paper, 10 x 13 in.
Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 02.8.2

Nov 12, 2009Mar 14, 2010

In fall of 2009, the Studio Museum explored and engaged its permanent collection with the exhibition A Delicate Touch: Watercolors from the Permanent Collection. Presenting eighteen works on paper, A Delicate Touch brought together works dating from the late 1940s to 2007 that share the same medium.

Watercolor is quick, lightweight and portable. Successfully painting with watercolors requires dexterity, a soft touch and a delicate hand. The medium has an extensive history that dates back to European Paleolithic cave paintings. Scribes used watercolor to decorate illuminated manuscripts in the Middle Ages and European Renaissance. Eventually, watercolor became the technique of choice for artists to make sketches, copies and small-scale versions of larger works. Watercolor’s portability may account for why it was, and still is in many instances, the preferred painting style for depicting nature, wildlife and nautical themes.

The artists in this exhibition use the medium in a variety of ways. John Dowell, whose work Delicate Touch (1977) provided the inspiration for the title of the exhibition, uses watercolor to create meditations on jazz. Other mid-twentieth-century artists, including Romare Bearden, Beauford Delaney and Norman Lewis, chose watercolor for landscapes and nature scenes. Meanwhile, contemporary artists, including John Bankston, Wangechi Mutu and Otobong Nkanga, use the medium to capture forms and figures.

Organized by Curatorial Assistant Lauren Haynes, A Delicate Touch examined the Studio Museum’s collection through a well-known artistic medium and was an exciting opportunity to see works never presented at the Museum before, as well as fragile pieces not often shown. This exhibition gave us the chance to reflect on the treasures in our care while creating and facilitating conversations about them.