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The Long Road: Bill Traylor

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  • Bill Traylor
    Peg–Legged Man, c. 1939-42
    Pencil, poster paint on found cardboard
    11. 5 × 8 inches

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Black Male dog with red eye and tongue), n.d.
    Pencil and poster paint on found cardboard
    16 × 16. 5 inches

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Blue Man on Red Object), ca. 1939-1942
    Poster paint and pencil on cardboard
    11 3/4 × 7 3/4 inches
    Courtesy High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, purchase with funds from Mrs. Lindsey Hopkins, Jr., Edith G. and Philip A. Rhodes and the Members Guild, 1982.93

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Exciting Event: House with Figures), c. 1939-1947
    Poster paint and pencil on cardboard
    13 1/2 × 13 7/8 inches
    Courtesy High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, T. Marshall Hahn Collection, 1997.114
    Photo by Mike Jensen

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Figures, Construction), c. 1940–1942
    Poster paint and graphite on cardboard
    12 5/8 × 11 5/8 inches
    Courtesy Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, gift of Charles and Eugenia Shannon, 1982.4.16
    Photo by Lyle Peterzell

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Man in Blue Pants), c. 1939-1947
    Poster paint, pencil, colored pencil, and charcoal on cardboard
    10 5/8 × 7 1/4 inches
    Courtesy High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, T. Marshall Hahn Collection, 1997.115
    Photo by Mike Jensen

  • For comparison, a Jim Crow caricature.

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Woman with Bird), c. 1940-1942
    Poster paint and graphite on cardboard
    13 1/4 × 7 3/8 inches
    Courtesy Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, gift of Charles and Eugenia Shannon, 1982.4.07
    Photo by Lyle Peterzell

The American Folk Art Museum’s exhibition on Bill Traylor, perhaps the most extensive to date and certainly the most in-depth consideration of his work in a New York museum, is the final justification of Traylor as a canonical self-taught artist.  It is also an emphatic validation for Charles Shannon, who “discovered” Traylor in 1939 and began archiving his work.  His persistent efforts to exhibit Traylor and garner appreciation for his work in cultural institutions are thoroughly discussed in the exhibition.  In this, the exhibition is nearly a double homage:  to the artist and to the preserver.

Stephen Burrows: Clothes that Danced

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  • Installation view of Stephen Burrows: When Fashion Danced
    Museum of the City of New York
    March 22, 2013—July 28, 2013

    Photo: Monique Long

  • Installation view of Stephen Burrows: When Fashion Danced
    Museum of the City of New York
    March 22, 2013—July 28, 2013
    White lettuce edged chiffon billowed over the exhibition.
    Photo: Monique Long

  • Wrap Top Pants Suit, 1970s
    Jasco matte jersey, lettuce edge
    Label: Stephen Burrows’ World
    Photo: Monique Long

  • Coat, 1977
    Merrow-edged wool melton
    Label: Stephen Burrows’ World

  • Tunic Dress, 1977
    Natural chamois banded in gilt metallic snakeskin
    Label: Stephen Burrows’ World
    Photo: Monique Long

  • Burrows was a master draper who made sexy, fluid, body conscious ensembles that permitted no underpinnings whatsoever.
    Photo: Monique Long

  • A Stephen Burrows sketch with his signature lettuce edge.

  • Pat Cleveland, the designer's muse

A career retrospective of the fashion designer Stephen Burrows opened at the Museum of the City of New York this spring and has been the most current highlight in the over 40-year career of a designer who has seen many highlights.

radicalpresenceny.org is now online!

radicalpresenceny.org, the website accompanying the forthcoming Studio Museum exhibition (co-presented with the Grey Art Gallery at NYU), Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art has launched today!

Summer/Fall 2013 Studio Magazine now available!

The NEW issue of Studio Magazine is now available online for your reading pleasure! You can also pick up a copy in person at the Museum starting on Thursday, July 18! 

You can also read select back issues of Studio here!

Spring 2013 Exhibitions [Photos]

Highlights

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  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Photo: Scott Rudd

On Wednesday, March 27, guests were invited to preview the Studio Museum's Spring 2013 Exhibitions and Projects: David Hartt: Stray Light, Fred Wilson: Local Color, Ayé A. Aton: Space-Time Continuum, Mendi + Keith Obadike: American Cypher, Assembly Required: Selections From the Permanent Collection, Brothers and Sisters, and Harlem Postcards: Spring 2013

Visualizing Historic Spaces Through Untitled (Structures)

A brief look into Untitled (Structures): Leslie Hewitt in collaboration with Bradford Young

  • Leslie Hewitt (b. 1977), in collaboration with Bradford Young (b. 1970)
    Untitled (Structures), 2012
    Courtesy the artists and Lucien Terras, Inc.

Former Studio Museum artist-in-residence and 2010 recipient of the Joyce Alexander Wein Prize, Leslie Hewitt (b. 1977) brings a fresh and dynamic perspective into how we visually experience our history in her new film installation, Untitled (Structures) (2012), at the Menil Collection in Houston.

Three Decades of Terry Adkins at the Tang

  • Installation view, Terry Adkins Recital, Tang Museum, 2012
    Upper-right: Darkwater Record, 2003-2008, recorders, bust, mixed media, installation dimensions variable, courtesy of the artist Lower-left: Still, 2000, steel, wood, glass, whiskey, 17 x 33 inches, Hood Museum of Art, Darthmouth College, purchased through the Guernsey Center Moore 1904 Fund; S.2003.39

Former Studio Museum in Harlem artist-in-residence, Terry Adkins, brings together thirty years of work for his new installation at the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY.

The works of art in Recital pay homage to the legacies of Bessie Smith, W. E. B. Du Bois, John Brown, Matthew Henson and John Coltrane, among others. Adkins’s creative research sheds light on lesser-known aspects of their biographies, such as Jimi Hendrix’s military training as a paratrooper in the 101st Airborne, or the question of Beethoven’s Moorish ancestry. In his sculpture, photography, and video, Adkins transforms and re-purposes a range of found materials, archival imagery, and reclaimed actions in a process that he calls potential disclosure.

30 Americans: Rubell Family Collection

Featured Store Item!

  • 30 Americans: The Rubell Family Collection (cover)
    Photo: Sophia Bruneau

30 Americans is the perfect primer for both budding and established aficionados of contemporary African-American art. Based on the Rubell Family Collection's 2011 show by the same name, the expanded second edition of 30 Americans actually includes work by 31 artists. The misnomer speaks to the ever expanding core of influential black artists in the U.S. The artists included range greatly in subject, time period, and medium from William Pope.L to Mickalene Thomas to Carrie Mae Weems to Rashid Johnson. Insightful essays tracing common threads of influence and exploring the subtle transition from artists of African descent to artists of America, as well as changing definitions and receptions of black art, bind the works together and provide a framework for meaningful understanding. Its breadth, generously sized full-color plates, and affordable price make 30 Americans a must have.

Available for purchase in the Museum Store.

Watch: Derrick Adams

"Communicating with Shadows" Series

In "Communicating with Shadows," New York-based artist Derrick Adams  selects iconic photographic documentations of performances by post-war artists including Bruce Nauman, Adrian Piper, Senga Nengudi and David Hammons. He projects these images, adding slight animation and a soundtrack composed by Ramon Silva, then improvises in front of them, casting his own shadow over the original images. Adams uses mass-produced objects as props and costumes to create what he calls “an attempt to channel the original performances' essence and intention.” Animating the original live action, Adams transforms still photographs into the conceptual building blocks and interactive sets of his performances.

Performed on May 4, 2012 at The Studio Museum in Harlem.

Preserving Legacy with Jamel Shabazz

  • Natasha Adams
    Darlene, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

In Hands On: Photography – Preserving Legacy students participated in a project that documented their family and communities over the course of a week. In this two-part workshop, photographer and educator Jamel Shabazz shared his work, discussed his art-making philosophy, and offered practical and technical direction for taking photos. Shabazz guided students in an invaluable project that preserves the legacy of what is important to them through photography.

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  • Yasmine Braithwaite
    A Moment in Time, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

     

  • Natasha Adams
    Aunty, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

  • Philip Romero
    Family Over Everything, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

  • Philip Romero
    Mom and Brother, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

  • Yasmine Braithwaite
    Reminiscing, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

  • Philip Pine
    Untitled 1, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

  • Nazareth Battice
    Untitled 1, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

  • Nazareth Battice
    Untitled 2, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

  • Isaiah Bonnie
    Untitled, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

  • Isaiah Bonnie
    Untitled 2, 2012
    Courtesy the artist

  • Philip Pine
    Untitled 2, 2012
    Courtesy the artist