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The Long Road: Bill Traylor

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  • Bill Traylor
    Peg–Legged Man, c. 1939-42
    Pencil, poster paint on found cardboard
    11. 5 × 8 inches

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Black Male dog with red eye and tongue), n.d.
    Pencil and poster paint on found cardboard
    16 × 16. 5 inches

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Blue Man on Red Object), ca. 1939-1942
    Poster paint and pencil on cardboard
    11 3/4 × 7 3/4 inches
    Courtesy High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, purchase with funds from Mrs. Lindsey Hopkins, Jr., Edith G. and Philip A. Rhodes and the Members Guild, 1982.93

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Exciting Event: House with Figures), c. 1939-1947
    Poster paint and pencil on cardboard
    13 1/2 × 13 7/8 inches
    Courtesy High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, T. Marshall Hahn Collection, 1997.114
    Photo by Mike Jensen

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Figures, Construction), c. 1940–1942
    Poster paint and graphite on cardboard
    12 5/8 × 11 5/8 inches
    Courtesy Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, gift of Charles and Eugenia Shannon, 1982.4.16
    Photo by Lyle Peterzell

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Man in Blue Pants), c. 1939-1947
    Poster paint, pencil, colored pencil, and charcoal on cardboard
    10 5/8 × 7 1/4 inches
    Courtesy High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, T. Marshall Hahn Collection, 1997.115
    Photo by Mike Jensen

  • For comparison, a Jim Crow caricature.

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Woman with Bird), c. 1940-1942
    Poster paint and graphite on cardboard
    13 1/4 × 7 3/8 inches
    Courtesy Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, gift of Charles and Eugenia Shannon, 1982.4.07
    Photo by Lyle Peterzell

The American Folk Art Museum’s exhibition on Bill Traylor, perhaps the most extensive to date and certainly the most in-depth consideration of his work in a New York museum, is the final justification of Traylor as a canonical self-taught artist.  It is also an emphatic validation for Charles Shannon, who “discovered” Traylor in 1939 and began archiving his work.  His persistent efforts to exhibit Traylor and garner appreciation for his work in cultural institutions are thoroughly discussed in the exhibition.  In this, the exhibition is nearly a double homage:  to the artist and to the preserver.

Stephen Burrows: Clothes that Danced

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  • Installation view of Stephen Burrows: When Fashion Danced
    Museum of the City of New York
    March 22, 2013—July 28, 2013

    Photo: Monique Long

  • Installation view of Stephen Burrows: When Fashion Danced
    Museum of the City of New York
    March 22, 2013—July 28, 2013
    White lettuce edged chiffon billowed over the exhibition.
    Photo: Monique Long

  • Wrap Top Pants Suit, 1970s
    Jasco matte jersey, lettuce edge
    Label: Stephen Burrows’ World
    Photo: Monique Long

  • Coat, 1977
    Merrow-edged wool melton
    Label: Stephen Burrows’ World

  • Tunic Dress, 1977
    Natural chamois banded in gilt metallic snakeskin
    Label: Stephen Burrows’ World
    Photo: Monique Long

  • Burrows was a master draper who made sexy, fluid, body conscious ensembles that permitted no underpinnings whatsoever.
    Photo: Monique Long

  • A Stephen Burrows sketch with his signature lettuce edge.

  • Pat Cleveland, the designer's muse

A career retrospective of the fashion designer Stephen Burrows opened at the Museum of the City of New York this spring and has been the most current highlight in the over 40-year career of a designer who has seen many highlights.

radicalpresenceny.org is now online!

radicalpresenceny.org, the website accompanying the forthcoming Studio Museum exhibition (co-presented with the Grey Art Gallery at NYU), Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art has launched today!

Draped Down

Curatorial Fellow Monique Long on Fashion in Harlem and Art

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  • Curatorial Fellow Monique Long

  • Elan Ferguson, Studio Museum Family Programs Coordinator, at our Summer 2013 opening
    Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Style conscious visitors reflecting on the work featured in Robert Pruitt: Women.
    Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Colorful prints were ubiquitous at our Summer 2013 opening.
    Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Menswear is in the midst of a renaissance at the moment. Three gentlemen enjoy the work of Robert Pruitt in the main galleries.
    Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Artist Jacolby Satterwhite
    Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Singer Solange Knowles snaps a photo in VideoStudio: Long Takes
    Photo: Scott Rudd

  • White is a summer staple.
    Photo: Scott Rudd

  • Barkley L. Hendricks: Birth of Cool (installation view)
    The Studio Museum in Harlem, 2008–09
    Photo: Adam Reich

In the glossary that accompanied Zora Neale Hurston’s short story “Story in Harlem Slang,” (1942) there are five different terms listed for someone fashionable. Invariably, iconic photographs of Harlemites include those dressed in blindingly fashionable clothes. There’s a rich history and tradition in Harlem that defines the neighborhood not only as the cornerstone of African-American culture but style as well. Visitors and residents alike assimilate to the expectation that you must express yourself fashionably here, demonstrated beautifully by the attendees at our summer opening in July and the monumental drawings by Rob Pruitt of fashionable women that hang in the main gallery.

This Summer, I...

Summer 2013 Curatorial Intern Martha Scott Burton reflects on her time at Studio Museum

  • Summer 2013 Curatorial Intern Martha Scott Burton
    Photo: Scott Rudd

One of Studio Museum’s many partners is the ARTS Intern program, developed by the nonprofit organization Studio in a School, through which college undergraduate students from diverse cultural backgrounds gain work experience at some of New York’s most exciting and influential institutions.  It is through this program that I have had the privilege of working as a Curatorial Intern over the past 9 weeks at the Studio Museum—certainly one of my most rewarding and educational experiences to date.
Growing up in a small Midwestern town (one of the many Springfields in Tornado Alley) with the closest major art institution over 4 hours away, I thought art history majors necessarily became teachers. But after moving to the city, where museums, galleries and auction houses are abundant, and after working at the Studio Museum, whose mission is pursued with singular energy, a whole new world opened up, almost at a flashpoint. 

Summer Internship Reflections

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  • Dyeemah Simmons, Summer 2013 Education ARTSintern (through Studio in a School)

  • Asha Whale, Summer 2013 Education Intern

  • Justin Allen, Summer 2013 Public Programs and Community Engagement Intern

On August 14, Erin Hylton, School Programs Coordinator, sat down with three college interns at the end of their summer internships in the programming departments of Community Engagement and Public Programs and Education, to reflect and share their experience at the Studio Museum with each other.

Justin Allen, the summer 2013 intern in The Studio Museum in Harlem’s Public Programs and Community Engagement department, is a rising senior and poetry major at the New School's Eugene Lang College. Harlemite Dyeemah Simmons studies Studio Art and English at Oberlin College, and this summer, she was an Education Department intern through Studio in a School's ARTSIntern program. Asha Whale, a Brooklyn native, came to intern at came to intern at the Studio Museum through the Jeanette K. Watson Fellowship; she is a History major at the City College of New York.

Uptown Fridays

DJ Shaun J. Wright and Host Ricky Jones Interpret Things in Themselves

The Studio Museum in Harlem’s Uptown Fridays is a series of summer parties that place its attendees in direct dialogue with the artwork in the Museum. Each program this summer is named after a current exhibition. The first party of the season, thrown on July 26, was titled Things in Themselves, after the 2012–13 artists in residence exhibition featuring the work of Steffani Jemison, Jennifer Packer and Cullen Washington Jr.

Ricky Jones (left) and DJ Shaun J. Wright (right). Photo: Edwin Ramoran

Summer/Fall 2013 Studio Magazine now available!

The NEW issue of Studio Magazine is now available online for your reading pleasure! You can also pick up a copy in person at the Museum starting on Thursday, July 18! 

You can also read select back issues of Studio here!

Sneak Peek

Summer 2013 Exhibitions and Projects

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  • Behind the scenes of Robert Pruitt: Women
    Photo: Kimberly Drew

  • Behind the scenes of Robert Pruitt: Women
    Photo: Kimberly Drew

  • Behind the scenes of Things in Themselves: 2012–13 Artists in Residence: Steffani Jemison, Jennifer Packer, Cullen Washington Jr.
    Photo: Kimberly Drew

  • Behind the scenes of Things in Themselves: 2012–13 Artists in Residence: Steffani Jemison, Jennifer Packer, Cullen Washington Jr.
    Photo: Kimberly Drew

  • Behind the scenes of No Filter: Expanding the Walls 2013
    Photo: Kimberly Drew

  • Behind the scenes of No Filter: Expanding the Walls 2013
    Photo: Kimberly Drew

  • Behind the scenes of Body Language
    Photo: Kimberly Drew

  • Behind the scenes of Body Language
    Photo: Kimberly Drew

The Museum is preparing for the opening of its Summer 2013 exhibitions, which will be on view July 18–October 27, 2013. Check out these installation views, then see the shows for yourself! 

 

Books & Authors, Kids! presents Ambre Anderson

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  • The cover of Qualities by Ambre Anderson

  • Author Ambre Anderson during Books & Authors, Kids!

  • Author Ambre Anderson

The Studio Museum in Harlem jump started National Library Week with a Books & Authors, Kids! program on April 14, 2013 with author and illustrator, Ambre Anderson. Anderson read from her book, Qualities and facilitated a fun origami animal art workshop.  

Qualities is a colorful and engaging story of a little girl’s journey through the animal kingdom. Ambre Anderson says she created Qualities, “to promote awareness to children about how to find their own confidence." Little Lee, the book's main character, learns about the special abilities of different animals and discovers her own special qualities.

What are your good qualities?