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Feature Friday!

It's that time again...

Head over to Twitter to take part in our weekly Feature Friday contest! Our avatar (the icon next to our name) has changed to a detail of an artwork in our permanent collection. It’s up to you to scour the permanent collection section of our website, here, to find the piece. The first person to tweet us, correctly identifying the artwork, will receive free admission for two guests!

J’aime mon écharpe!

A Fluxus Epiphany

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  • Scarf by Fluxus artist Ben Vautier

  • Scarf by Fluxus artist Ben Vautier

If you have ever seen me in the winter months, you know that my face is more often than not perpetually swaddled, mummy-style, in a thick, black woolen scarf with white cursive writing covering it. But this scarf, pilfered from my mother who bought it in Paris years ago, is more than just a warm and aesthetically-pleasing defense against the cold. What I never realized, until an incredibly astute former colleague and Fluxus connoisseur pointed it out to me only a few weeks ago, is that this scarf is in fact a work of art by French Fluxus artist Ben Vautier (b. 1935).

Sharing is Caring

Gerald Leavell on ETW '11

  • Gerald Leavell, Youth Programs and Expanding the Walls Coordinator, with the 2011 Expanding the Walls artists

Here at the Studio Museum, Gerald Leavell coordinates youth programs and Expanding The Walls (ETW), an eight-month photography-based program for a select group of teenagers.

Working with New York City teenagers from diverse backgrounds and varying tastes and skills in the arts certainly inspires me to be better. Period. I am constantly exploring ways that I can improve my own art, my knowledge of art history and my vocabulary in order to better support the students in their artistic development.

Feature Friday Recap!

Results from Our First Weekly Twitter Contest

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  • Dave McKenzie
    Self-Portrait Piñata, 2002
    Gift of the artist  05.21.1
     

  • Barkley Hendricks
    Lawdy Mama, 1969
    Gift of Stuart Liebman, in memory of Joseph B. Liebman  83.25

     

We're thrilled with the results of our first Feature Friday Twitter contest! @marcy_s was our first winner, correctly guessing that the first detail was from Dave McKenzie's Self-Portrait Piñata, 2002. McKenzie was a 2003-2004 artist in residence and if you love his work as much as we do, you'll definitely want to buy one of his Studio (un)framed editions.

Building the Contemporary Collection: Five Years of Acquistions

Emerging Artists of Color

  • Mickalene Thomas
    Lovely Six Foota, 2007.
    C-print, 19 x 23 3/8 in.
    Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.
     

In celebration of the museum's fifth anniversary, this stunning exhibition of works from the Nasher's permanent collection features a variety of contemporary artists of African descent.

Building the Contemporary Collection: Five Years of Acquistions will be on view through August 14, 2011 at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.

Feature Friday!

A New Weekly Twitter Contest

Do you follow us on Twitter? If not, you might miss out on our exciting new Feature Friday Twitter contest, starting today! Each Friday, our avatar (the icon next to our name) will change to a detail of an artwork in our permanent collection. It’s up to you to scour the permanent collection section of our website, here, to find the piece. The first person to tweet us, correctly identifying the artwork, will receive free admission for two guests! So, head to our Twitter page now the see what our avatar is today. Happy hunting!

Art Invades the Museum Store

Saya Woolfalk's Diorama for Empathic Life

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  • Installation shot from Saya Woolfalk's diorama for Empathic Life in the Museum Store

  • Installation shot from Saya Woolfalk's diorama for Empathic Life in the Museum Store

  • Installation shot from Saya Woolfalk's diorama for Empathic Life in the Museum Store

Visit the Museum Store and you might suspect that you’ve stumbled upon a rift in the space time continuum. In an area where you previously would have found our usual displays of fantastic books, jewelry and gifts, you’ll encounter mysterious figures clad in elaborate costumes, emerging from an other-worldly terrain.

Score!

Performing with Benjamin Patterson

This video documents Saya Woolfalk performing the score, Ring Small Bell from Benjamin Patterson's Methods and Processes, 1962, and the audience performing Patterson's Paper Piece, 1961, at the Studio Museum, March 31, 2011.

Flux with Us

A Personal Perspective on Benjamin Patterson

  • L-R: Valerie Cassel Oliver, Benjamin Patterson, Matthew D. Morrison

After last week's Benjamin Patterson performance, I asked one of the fearless audience volunteers, Matthew D. Morrison--a Ph.D. Candidate in Historical Musicology at Columbia University--if he would share his experiences performing one of Patterson's scores from Methods and Processes, 1962. Being such a good sport, he said yes, and I am happy to share his reflections with you.

Fluxus is a great state!

Performing with Benjamin Patterson

If you attended last night's unclassifiable performance/discussion with Benjamin Patterson and Valerie Cassell Oliver, you know exactly how fun it was. If you missed it, kick yourself now. It was my favorite type of public program, where you learn a lot and laugh even more! Mr. Patterson spoke charmingly and elequently about his amazing work and his many adventures--which would have been a great program in itself--and then challenged the entire audience to participate in perfoming some of his scores. And perfrom we did! In the next blog post, look for a first-person account by one of our brave soloists, Matthew D. Morrison, who will never think of a beet the same way again.