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Stargazers at The Bronx Museum

  • Stargazers (installation view) 
    courtesy The Bronx Museum
     

Stargazers: Elizabeth Catlett in Conversation with 21 Contemporary Artists will be on view through May 29 at The Bronx Museum

Installation view includes the following works:
Sanford Biggers, Afropick, 2005; Elizabeth Catlett, Homage to the Panthers,1970; Elizabeth Catlett, Reclining Woman (Mujer Reclinada), 2006;  Lalla Essaydi, Idle Afternoon #2, 2008.
 

Snow Day in Harlem!

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  • Photo by Gabrielle Lopez

  • photo by Donald Andrew Agarrat

  • 127th Street between 5th & Lenox Avenues
    Photo by Amanda Russhell Wallace

  • Photo by Hallie Hobson

  • Photo by Lynn Lieberman

  • 110th Street near Lenox Avenue
    Photo by Lynn Lieberman

  • Photo by Gabrielle Lopez

  • 112th Street between 7th and 8th Avenues
    Photo by Lynn Lieberman

  • Photo by @butterflyylost

  • 127th Street between 5th Lenox Avenues
    Photo by Amanda Russhell Wallace

  • photo by Donald Andrew Agarrat

Readers are invited to share their photos of Harlem in the snow! Thanks to our contributors Donald Andrew Agarrat, Lynn Lieberman, Hallie Hobson, Amanda Russhell Wallace, Gabrielle Lopez and our Twitter follower @butterflyylost.

Museum Closed Today Due to Inclement Weather

Snow Day!

The Studio Museum is closed today, January 27, due to the snow. Send us your pictures of Harlem in the snow and we will publish on Studio Blog!

Pick of the Week

Henry Ossawa Tanner at The Des Moines Art Center

  • Henry Ossawa Tanner
    The Disciples See Christ Walking on the Water, c.1907
    Oil on canvas
    51 1/2 x 42 in.
    Des Moines Art Center Permanent Collections; Gift of the Des Moines Association of Fine Arts, 1921.1
     

Henry Ossawa Tanner and his Contemporaries will be on view through February 27 at The Des Moines Art Center

 

 

 

Books & Authors: UP/DOWN, NORTH/SOUTH

Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts and V. Mitch McEwen in Conversation

  • Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts
    Photo: Francois Halard

In August 1964, Harper’s Magazine published a 1948 essay by Ralph Ellison called “Harlem is Nowhere,” in which he writes: “The phrase ‘I’m nowhere’ expresses the feeling borne in upon many Negroes that they have no stable, recognized place in society. One’s identity drifts in a capricious reality in which even the most commonly held assumptions are questionable. One ‘is’ literally, but one is nowhere; one wanders dazed in a ghetto maze, a ‘displaced person’ of American democracy.” Separate from the social and economic changes taking place in Harlem, Ellison was interested in contextualizing its “psychological character.”

Invisible Man Revealed!

Public Art by Elizabeth Catlett

  • image: nycgovparks.org

I recently got an invitation that featured a striking image of Elizabeth Catlett’s Invisible Man (2003), a public sculpture in Riverside Park. I am embarrassed to say that I did not know that this monumental (15 feet tall!) work by an artist whose work I love is installed less than two miles away. I can’t wait to walk over and check it out…maybe when it stops snowing.

The Sounds behind StudioSound

Matana Roberts's Playlist

  • Matana Roberts
    Papa Joe (from COIN COIN Happenings), 2010
    Photocollage, charcoal and pastel on cardboard
    Courtesy the artist

This week guest blogger Matana Roberts, our current StudioSound artist, shares some of her favorite music!

My thirst for sound knowledge spirals from the traditions of the jazz alto saxophone, which is my main tool of reference, or "weapon of choice," as it was recently described to me. But it is heavily combined at this point with other sound aspects that intrigue me and filter through my work right now, such as language, repetition and trance. Below are items on my current playlist, chosen completely randomly. There's so much sound to explore out there, that I can barely keep track myself. By the time this posts, I will be onwards to completely different soundscapes most likely, but here are a few that I thought might pique any sound-seeker's interest:

Holiday Gift Guide

Gifts from the Museum Store

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  • Sheila Bridges Harlem Toile Bed Sheets 
    Item: #3311
    Price: $56.00
    Member Price: $47.60

  • Harlem Charm Bracelet by: G-Squared
    Item# 694
    Price: $325.00
    Member: $276.25

  • Knit Hat by: Two’s Company
    Item: #2917
    Price: $13.00
    Member: $11.05



  • Snowflake Mirror by: Two’s Company
    Item: #1589
    Price: $9.00
    Member: $7.65

  • Studio Museum in Harlem Coloring Book for little artists
    Item: #1338
    Price: $7.00
    Member: $5.95

  • Wardell Milan: Drawings of Harlem Umbrella created exclusively for the Studio Museum
    Item: 1376
    Price: $30.00
    Member Price: $25.50

  • Leaning Book Ends by: Kikkerland
    Item: #5027
    Price: $35.00
    Member Price: $29.75

  • Kamala Change Purse by: Two’s Company
    Item: #1558
    Price: $9.50
    Member Price: $8.07

  • Gear Clock by: Kikkerland
    Item: #5041
    Price: $68.00
    Member Price: $57.80

  • Re:Collection

    Selected workds from The Studio Museum in Harlem

    Item: #118
    Price: $24.95
    Member Price: $21.20
     

  • Harlem: A Century in Images
    Item: #118
    Price: $55.00
    Member Price: $46.75
     

  • Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Any Number of Preoccupations Exhibition Catalogue
    Item: #2907
    Price: $22.00
    Member Price: $18.70
     

Need to do some last minute holiday shopping? Head Uptown to the Studio Museum Store to find the perfect gift for everyone on your list!

Browse through an exciting array of Studio Museum products and publications, including our special-edition Umbrella created exclusively by former Artist-in-Residence, Wardell Milan, as well as our Children's Coloring Book featuring the drawings of Studio Museum artists.

We carry the unique house wares of Harlem designer, Sheila Bridges. And we have a fun and whimsical assortment of unique and affordable gift items - from charm bracelets to gear clocks to colorful knit hats- that you'll only find at our Museum Store.

Happy Holidays and happy shopping!

Culture is a Glue

On "Black Male Re-Imagined"

Russell Simmons, Nick Cannon and Lupe Fiasco are famous faces who are pretty used to the perennial limelight—and if Simmons’s new reality show Running Russell Simmons is any indication, that limelight has only shifted to a consistently 24/7 level. On the evening of December 6th, the three celebrities sat down on a stage of perhaps a different sort than they’re accustomed to, in the gymnasium of our neighbor down the street, the Harlem Children’s Zone. They were participating in a community town hall meeting and discussion called Black Male Re-Imagined, along with John O’Neal of theater company Junebug Productions; Ann Beeson, Executive Director of U.S. Programs, Open Society Foundations; Alexis McGill Johnson, Executive Director of American Values Institute; and Jordan Coleman, teenage director of the documentary “Say It Loud.”In the wake of evidence that brings new urgency to the troubling proficiency gaps between young male students of color and white male students, the panel strove to discuss how art and culture can advance social justice.

Madeleine Hunt-Ehrlich’s Caribbean in America: Things and Time

Exhibition and Benefit for the Lambi Fund of Haiti

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  • Photo: Madeline Hunt-Ehrlich
     

  • Photo: Madeline Hunt-Ehrlich

  • Photo: Madeline Hunt-Ehrlich

Months after the earthquake that shook Haiti leaving its capitol city in shambles, and now giving way to an outburst of cholera, we published in Studio magazine a section dedicated to the country and its recent misfortune. Alongside an excerpt from acclaimed Haitian author Dany Laferriere and a photo essay documenting the artisan community of Croix-des-Bouquets, Madeleine Hunt-Ehrlich contributed images and a reflective essay centering on the country’s diaspora, both here in New York and in Miami’s Haitian enclave, Little Haiti.