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Counting the Block

Kira Lynn Harris's The Block | Bellona is one of those works of art you can look at again and again and always see something new. Inspired by another of my favorite blocks, I decided to enumerate a few of these things! In The Block | Bellona you'll find:

  • 68 windows (but only 5 shades!)
  • 11 doors
  • 5 angels
  • 5 cars
  • 3 birds
  • 2 cats
  • 1 fence
  • 1 TV
  • 1 light bulb

(I didn't count the bricks!)

Harlem-centric Blogs We're Reading!

  • Yara El-Sherbini
    Given Directions, 2009
    Courtesy the artist

It's no surprise that we love websites and blogs that feature the latest news and happenings from around the Harlem community. Here are a few that we frequent:

UPTOWNflavor

HarlemGal Inc.

Harlem + Bespoke

Harlem One Stop

Have suggestions for blogs we should check out? Send us a tweet (@StudioMuseum)!

Crafting Community

Ife Felix Leads Community Quilt Project

  • Faith Ringgold
    Echoes of Harlem, 1980
    Gift of Altria Group, Inc  08.13.10

During Target Free Sundays in January, quilt artist Ife Felix will lead a series of quilting workshops, during which you can contribute to the Community Quilt Project.

Interested in participating? Here's what to do:
Select a 5x7" fabric swatch that represents you, your family, or your community

All About Bearden

The Studio Museum and P.S. 36 School Partnership

  • Photo: Shanta Scott

This year, the Studio Museum is proud to partner with Margaret Douglas School (P.S. 36) in Harlem for an eight-week collaboration in the classrooms of kindergarten teachers Ms. Kouassi and Ms. Hutton.  Working with Studio Museum teaching artist Alisha Wormsley, both classes have been celebrating Romare Bearden’s centennial by exploring a theme prevalent in Bearden’s works: community. The students have been exploring and discussing the collages of Bearden as inspiration for a final photomontage project.

Diego Cupolo Captures the Streets of Harlem

  • Diego Cupolo
    Cheap Divorce, 2011
    Courtesy the artist

Photojournalist Diego Cupolo chronicles his wanderings throughout New York and beyond with his camera. Here, he shares  Cheap Divorce , a recent photo taken on 125th street.

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I took this photo while looking for a pawn shop. I wanted to sell a gold cross with Jesus on it, but it turned out to be fake. The pawn shop clerk said he knew it was fake simply by the sound it made. My Italian aunt gave it to me when I was a kid. What can you do? I was just trying to make extra cash for my trip to Nicaragua. That's where I am now and I'm heading south to Argentina. Harlem was my pit stop before take off.

- Diego Cupolo

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My Harlem: Cash for Gold

Development Assistant William Armstrong takes us on a tour of the neighborhood

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  • Photo: William Armstrong

  • Photo: William Armstrong

  • Photo: William Armstrong

  • Photo: William Armstrong

The glow of a Harlem brownstone, as it is cooled by the evening, is what I look forward to on my daily meanderings around Harlem. I like to believe that each brownstone represents a chapter in the illustrious history of Harlem. While walking on my daily commute to work, I look for a story in each brownstone I pass. Multiple doorbells tell me which ones are now apartments and iron gates reveal newer buildings, while differences in decay lead me to suspect whether additions had been made to the exterior. While growing up in the suburbs of Maryland, the most exciting neighborhood observations I could make were newly paved speed bumps—so imagine how my affection for city architecture has replaced the vinyl siding I’m used to.

Flux with Us

A Personal Perspective on Benjamin Patterson

  • L-R: Valerie Cassel Oliver, Benjamin Patterson, Matthew D. Morrison

After last week's Benjamin Patterson performance, I asked one of the fearless audience volunteers, Matthew D. Morrison--a Ph.D. Candidate in Historical Musicology at Columbia University--if he would share his experiences performing one of Patterson's scores from Methods and Processes, 1962. Being such a good sport, he said yes, and I am happy to share his reflections with you.

Snow Day in Harlem!

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  • Photo by Gabrielle Lopez

  • photo by Donald Andrew Agarrat

  • 127th Street between 5th & Lenox Avenues
    Photo by Amanda Russhell Wallace

  • Photo by Hallie Hobson

  • Photo by Lynn Lieberman

  • 110th Street near Lenox Avenue
    Photo by Lynn Lieberman

  • Photo by Gabrielle Lopez

  • 112th Street between 7th and 8th Avenues
    Photo by Lynn Lieberman

  • Photo by @butterflyylost

  • 127th Street between 5th Lenox Avenues
    Photo by Amanda Russhell Wallace

  • photo by Donald Andrew Agarrat

Readers are invited to share their photos of Harlem in the snow! Thanks to our contributors Donald Andrew Agarrat, Lynn Lieberman, Hallie Hobson, Amanda Russhell Wallace, Gabrielle Lopez and our Twitter follower @butterflyylost.

Museum Closed Today Due to Inclement Weather

Snow Day!

The Studio Museum is closed today, January 27, due to the snow. Send us your pictures of Harlem in the snow and we will publish on Studio Blog!

Culture is a Glue

On "Black Male Re-Imagined"

Russell Simmons, Nick Cannon and Lupe Fiasco are famous faces who are pretty used to the perennial limelight—and if Simmons’s new reality show Running Russell Simmons is any indication, that limelight has only shifted to a consistently 24/7 level. On the evening of December 6th, the three celebrities sat down on a stage of perhaps a different sort than they’re accustomed to, in the gymnasium of our neighbor down the street, the Harlem Children’s Zone. They were participating in a community town hall meeting and discussion called Black Male Re-Imagined, along with John O’Neal of theater company Junebug Productions; Ann Beeson, Executive Director of U.S. Programs, Open Society Foundations; Alexis McGill Johnson, Executive Director of American Values Institute; and Jordan Coleman, teenage director of the documentary “Say It Loud.”In the wake of evidence that brings new urgency to the troubling proficiency gaps between young male students of color and white male students, the panel strove to discuss how art and culture can advance social justice.