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Frieze London 2012

Artist Highlights

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  • Lorna Simpson
    Untitled (Ebony and Jet), 2012 and details
    Photos: Katherine Finerty

  • Chris Ofili
    Golden Angel One, 2012 and Golden Angel Three, 2012
    Photos: Katherine Finerty

  • Chris Ofili
    Ovid-Callisto, 2011-12 and Untitled, 1998-99
    Photos: Katherine Finerty

  • Isaac Julien
    Yishan Island, Voyage (Ten Thousand Waves), 2011
    Photo: Katherine Finerty

  • Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
    [L-R]: Clarity in Waiting, 2012, Songs in the Head, 2012 and Oyster, 2012
    Photos: Katherine Finerty

  • Theaster Gates
    Horizon, 2012 and Urban Particulate, 2012
    Photos: Katherine Finerty

  • Julie Mehretu
    [L-R]: Untitled, 2002, Untitled, 2002 and Untitled, 2002
    Photos: Katherine Finerty

  • Mark Bradford
    Spiders Feet, 2012 and detail
    Photo: Katherine Finerty

This past month London was bustling with art openings, projects, and performances, all a part of a phenomenon known as “Frieze.” From October 11–14, Regent’s Park played host to the Frieze art fair, presenting over 170 international contemporary galleries as well as a prestigious program of artist commissions and talks. Now in its tenth edition, Frieze London continues to be one of the art highlights of the year, generating a week filled with not only lucrative transactions, but also creative expression and critical awareness.

Notably, works by many Studio Museum in Harlem artists were prominently featured throughout the fair grounds. Here are some highlights of pieces by artists involved at the Museum, either through being represented in our Permanent Collection or having participated in our acclaimed Artist-in-Residence program. Enjoy!

Fall/Winter 2012–13 Exhibitions and Projects will now open Sunday, November 11th

*UPDATE*

Due to the recent weather conditions, The Studio Museum in Harlem’s Fall/Winter 2012–13 Exhibitions and Projects, including Fore and Gordon Parks: A Harlem Family 1967, will now open on November 11, 2012, instead of November 8, as previously announced. We look forward to updating you soon with more news.

The Museum staff and board send best wishes for the safety and well-being of all our friends, neighbors and colleagues.
 

In Conversation with Kura Shomali

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  • Kura Shomali
    Untitled (Boxeur), 2011-2012
    Courtesy of Jack Bell Gallery

  • Kura Shomali
    Sans titre (L'homme à la fleur), 2011
    Courtesy of Jack Bell Gallery

  • Kura Shomali
    Untitled (Malik), 2011
    Courtesy of Jack Bell Gallery

  • Kura Shomali
    Untitled, 2011
    Courtesy of Jack Bell Gallery

  • Kura Shomali
    Untitled, 2011
    Courtesy of Jack Bell Gallery

  • Cassius Clay Ali Boom Boom Ye (installation view), 2012
    Courtesy of Jack Bell Gallery

For Kura Shomali, an artist living and working in Kinshasa, Congo, L’art est une camisole et je ne sais comment la porte; une peur intérieure de ne pas pouvoir répondre aux peurs collectives. Seul l’art pourra l’apaiser.

"Art is a straight jacket and I do not know how to wear it; an inner fear of not being able to meet the collective fears. Only art can soothe."

Dispatch from dOCUMENTA (13)

Will Rawls in Conversation with Thomas J. Lax

Dancer and choreographer Will Rawls (b. 1978) recently finished performing in British-German artist Tino Sehgal’s (b. 1976) This Variation, in dOCUMENTA (13). Founded in 1955 in the wake of World War II, documenta is an exhibition of international contemporary art occurring every five years in Kassel, Germany. In This Variation, audience-members enter a darkened room in Hugenottenhaus, a disused building in Kassel constructed by migrant workers in the early nineteenth century. A group of contemporary dancers, singers, musicians, physical theater actors and a mime respond with sounds, speech fragments and movement phrases, what Rawls calls a “dramaturgy of events”. The work is made live, as the order, volume, and direction of the dramaturgy are decided by and communicated amongst the dancers in direct response to the audience.

Beautiful Ha(a)rlem

The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same

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  • Located on 145th and Frederick Douglass Blvd. Formerly known as "Willies Burgers"

  • Photo: Kelsie Bonaparte

  • Photo: Kelsie Bonaparte

  • Photo: Kelsie Bonaparte

  • Photo: Kelsie Bonaparte

  • Photo: Kelsie Bonaparte

  • Photo: Kelsie Bonaparte

  • Photo: Kelsie Bonaparte

  • Photo: Kelsie Bonaparte

Harlem is the center of African-American culture. Being a Harlem native, I know this is a neighborhood built on a rich and remarkable history that spans decades. One recent afternoon, I took some time to reflect on this neighborhood's tradition and beauty (all through the lens of my smart phone)!  As I stepped outside I was immediately enveloped by the hustle and bustle of 125th Street.

I made my way up to 145th Street and Frederick Douglass Blvd. and commenced my mini photo tour through Harlem. As I was taking photos, the memories of the Harlem I used to know came flooding back to mind. It finally dawned on me how much Harlem has physically changed!

I realize now more than ever that I should appreciate the things that are familiar all the while accepting changes that are for the better. Feel free to check out some photos from my day in Harlem!

Tags: harlem, lenox

My Perspective

Gordon Parks: 100 Years at the International Center of Photography

  • Photo: Kevin Brisco

In June, I visited the International Center of Photography to view Gordon Parks: 100 Years, an ambitious hundred-year retrospective of Gordon Parks’s photography. The exhibition celebrates the centennial birth of the multitalented photographer and filmmaker. I arrived from the museum’s south side. After  a few minutes of searching, I was guided to the gallery’s north side to a massive window display. Behind the display was a 20-by 13-foot mural of Parks’s Emerging Man. Three monitors were placed in front of the image, each shifting through various Parks photographs.

A Polyphony of Politically Engaged Art

Interview with Benjamin Barson

  • Photo: Sasha Mishkin

On Friday, June 22nd,  Katrina De Wees, Education Assistant at The Studio Museum in Harlem, sat down with Benjamin Barson, Production Manager at Ginny’s Supper Club Red Rooster Harlem, to discuss his most recent project, in collaboration with Arturo O’Farrill’s Grammy Award Winning Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra and El Museo Del Barrio.

Katrina De Wees: Can you start with an introduction of yourself?

Made in L.A. 2012

Assistant Curator Naima Keith Attends "Made in L.A." Opening

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  • Brenna Youngblood Installation, 2012

  • "Made in L.A.," 2012

  • Nzuji De Magalhães Installation, 2012

  • "Made in L.A.," 2012

  • Nzuji De Magalhães, 2012

Last week, I swapped coasts to attend the opening of “Made in L.A. 2012,” Los Angeles’s first biennial. “Made in L.A. 2012”—collaboratively organized by the Hammer Museum and LAXART—is an exciting survey of contemporary artistic production in L.A., exhibiting new work from sixty emerging and under-recognized artists produced for the biennial. Although many of the participating artists share the same zip code, their work is incredibly diverse spanning all imaginable themes and mediums—imbuing this LA-based exhibition with international relevance. Matching the immensity of the L.A. landmass, the large-scale exhibition is installed in three different locations throughout the city: The Hammer Museum in Westwood, LAXART in Culver City, and the Department of Cultural Affairs Gallery in Barnsdall Park.

Arts & Minds Celebrates First Exhibition Opening

at Lumen Gallery, NYC

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  • Arts & Minds artwork at Lumen Gallery. Photo: Sophia Bruneau

  • Photo: Sophia Bruneau

  • Photo: Sophia Bruneau

  • Arts & Minds program participant photographed in front of artwork, a collage piece inspired by Bearden Project artist, Dominique Moody. Photo: Sophia Bruneau

  • Photo: Sophia Bruneau

  • [L-R]: Shanta Scott, Manager of School, Youth & Family Programs, The Studio Museum in Harlem; Landon and Celia Wickham, program participants; Carolyn Halpin-Healy, Executive Director of Arts & Minds. Photo: Sophia Bruneau

April 23, 2012 marked Arts & Mindsfirst-ever exhibition opening at Lumen Gallery in New York City, celebrating the artwork created by the program’s participants at The Studio Museum in Harlem over the course of the year.

In the Fall of 2011, program participants dove deep into collage, inspired by the Studio Museum's Fall exhibition, The Bearden Project. Watercolors, newspaper, and even natural materials such as eucalyptus and twigs were used to interpret the participant’s own creative responses to various works from The Bearden Project. The evolution of the participants' technique and ability was clearly visible that night, and the framed artworks were proof of how powerful art can be as a therapeutic tool. Meanwhile, the artists behind the artwork glowed with pride.

Walking Bearden’s Block

at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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  • Romare Bearden
    The Block (installation view), 1971
    Cut and pasted printed, colored and metallic papers, photostats, pencil, ink marker, gouache, watercolor, and pen and ink on Masonite, 48 x 216 in.
    Photo: Lauren Glaves.

  • Romare Bearden
    The Block (detail), 1971
    Photo: Lauren Glaves.

  • Romare Bearden
    The Block (detail), 1971
    Photo: Lauren Glaves.

Last seen in the spring of 2010, Romare Bearden’s The Block (1971) is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in celebration of the centennial of his birthday. On the eve of his first museum retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in 1971, Bearden was seated in writer and close friend Albert Murray’s apartment, as he recorded the view of Lenox Avenue between 132nd and 133rd streets in a series of sketches, which informed the process for the six paneled, 18 foot wide triumph, The Block.