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Elsewhere

Thelma's Current Exhibition Picks

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  • Lamar Peterson
    The Window, 2010
    Courtesy the artist and Fredricks & Freiser, New York

  • Archibald Motley
    Nightlife, 1943
    The Art Institute of Chicago; Restricted gift of Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Field, Jack and Sandra Guthman, Ben W. Heineman, Ruth Horwich, Lewis and Susan Manilow, Beatrice C. Mayer, Charles A. Meyer, John D. Nichols, and Mr. and Mrs. E.B. Smith, Jr.; James W. Alsdorf Memorial Fund; Goodman Endowment, 1992.89

  • Yinka Shonibare, MBE
    Magic Ladder Kid I, 2013
    Commissioned by The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia
    Image courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York

  • Herbert Gentry
    Dance Turquoise, 1978
    Courtesy Mary Ann Rose/The Estate of Herbert Gentry

Blue Plastic Bubbles: Paintings by Lamar Peterson
On view through April 5, 2014
University Art Museum, SUNY Albany
1400 Washington Avenue
Albany, NY 12222
Albany.edu/museum

Around Town

Gulu Real Art Studio: Martina Bacigalupo

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  • Obal Dennis: “I choose backgrounds according to the person’s request, depending on the purpose of the photograph. For instance the “UWMFO,” (United Women for Co-operative Saving Society) wants their members to have their photos taken [with] a red background, I don’t know why—that’s their policy.”


    Image courtesy the artist and the Walther Collection

  • Patterns of dress and even aberrations in patterns are signs we normally read unconsciously but become more legible when the face is missing from the composition.

    Image courtesy the artist and the Walther Collection

  • Denis: “Red background is really fitting for our dark skin; it brings out the tone on the skin and makes it look nicer.”

    Image courtesy the artist and the Walther Collection

     

  • Gomesi (the garment worn here) is traditional African dress, most often worn by women who are well-to-do and married as a sign of being respectable.

    Image courtesy the artist and the Walther Collection

  • Denis: “My father taught me to be a professional photographer but as a young man we also discovered taking photos in a landscape format and full pose, seated on a stool. Then we punch out the heads to make passport photos. My father is very much against it this way because it’s not professional but it helps serve our customers’ needs when they need only one or two copies.”

    Image courtesy the artist and the Walther Collection

“There is no art to find the mind’s construction in the face...” Macbeth, William Shakespeare

What constitutes a portrait when the face of the subject is removed from the composition? A critical mass of 73 photographs, the Gulu Real Art Studio installation, recently on view at The Walther Collection Project Space in Chelsea, presented such portraits for contemplation. The images included in the exhibition were found materials salvaged from the trash behind a studio in Gulu, a town in northern Uganda, each portrait had the face cut out for use on official documents. After gaining permission, Italian photojournalist Martina Bacigalupo, who happened to be at the studio for her own portrait, was compelled to begin collecting the discarded photographs.

On Location

Curatorial Intern Margo Cohen Ristorucci checks out Jacolby Satterwhite's latest project, Grey Lines

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  • Jacolby Satterwhite programming his technology, preparing to film visitors to Recess
    Image courtesy the artist and Recess Activities, Inc., New York

  • Jacolby getting his bodysuit on a mannequin for the window display at Recess
    Image courtesy the artist and Recess Activities, Inc., New York

  • Jacolby Satterwhite in costume, filming visitors  at Recess
    Photo: Margo Cohen Ristorucci

  • Curatorial Intern Margo Ristorucci performing an interpretation of the drawing given to her by Satterwhite
    Photo: Margo Cohen Ristorucci

Over the past two months, Jacolby Satterwhite has transformed Recess Activities’s Soho space into an interactive performance, inviting passersby to act out his mother Patricia Satterwhite’s schematic drawings for Grey Lines—the newest work in his series, The Matriarch’s Rhapsody (2012). Recess’s primary program, Session, grants artists funding and access to its Soho and Red Hook locations to use as studios, exhibition venues or hybridized spaces of artistic experimentation. Over the course of his Session (August 17–October 12, 2013), Satterwhite created a 3D animated video incorporating drawing, CG animation and improvised or mediated performance.

Face to Face with the Duke of NOLA

Communications Assistant Kimberly Drew on her visit to Rashaad Newsome’s solo exhibition at the New Orleans Museum of Art

  • Rashaad Newsome
    Duke of NOLA, 2011
    Courtesy the artist and Marlborough Gallery, New York

I really wish I had heeded everyone's warnings when I embarked on my vacation to New Orleans. Friends said, "You'll love it there" and "Prepare for the best time of your life!" No one said, "Kim, prepare yourself for depression of massive proportions as your board your plane back to JFK..."

A week before my flight, I drafted my itinerary - I knew I'd have to see Rashaad Newsome's King of Arms at the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) and eat a po' boy. I didn't want to get too ambitious heading to a new city without a plan for transportation.  My primary goal was taking it easy in the “Big Easy”.

The Long Road: Bill Traylor

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  • Bill Traylor
    Peg–Legged Man, c. 1939-42
    Pencil, poster paint on found cardboard
    11. 5 × 8 inches

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Black Male dog with red eye and tongue), n.d.
    Pencil and poster paint on found cardboard
    16 × 16. 5 inches

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Blue Man on Red Object), ca. 1939-1942
    Poster paint and pencil on cardboard
    11 3/4 × 7 3/4 inches
    Courtesy High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, purchase with funds from Mrs. Lindsey Hopkins, Jr., Edith G. and Philip A. Rhodes and the Members Guild, 1982.93

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Exciting Event: House with Figures), c. 1939-1947
    Poster paint and pencil on cardboard
    13 1/2 × 13 7/8 inches
    Courtesy High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, T. Marshall Hahn Collection, 1997.114
    Photo by Mike Jensen

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Figures, Construction), c. 1940–1942
    Poster paint and graphite on cardboard
    12 5/8 × 11 5/8 inches
    Courtesy Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, gift of Charles and Eugenia Shannon, 1982.4.16
    Photo by Lyle Peterzell

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Man in Blue Pants), c. 1939-1947
    Poster paint, pencil, colored pencil, and charcoal on cardboard
    10 5/8 × 7 1/4 inches
    Courtesy High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, T. Marshall Hahn Collection, 1997.115
    Photo by Mike Jensen

  • For comparison, a Jim Crow caricature.

  • Bill Traylor
    Untitled (Woman with Bird), c. 1940-1942
    Poster paint and graphite on cardboard
    13 1/4 × 7 3/8 inches
    Courtesy Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, gift of Charles and Eugenia Shannon, 1982.4.07
    Photo by Lyle Peterzell

The American Folk Art Museum’s exhibition on Bill Traylor, perhaps the most extensive to date and certainly the most in-depth consideration of his work in a New York museum, is the final justification of Traylor as a canonical self-taught artist.  It is also an emphatic validation for Charles Shannon, who “discovered” Traylor in 1939 and began archiving his work.  His persistent efforts to exhibit Traylor and garner appreciation for his work in cultural institutions are thoroughly discussed in the exhibition.  In this, the exhibition is nearly a double homage:  to the artist and to the preserver.

Stephen Burrows: Clothes that Danced

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  • Installation view of Stephen Burrows: When Fashion Danced
    Museum of the City of New York
    March 22, 2013—July 28, 2013

    Photo: Monique Long

  • Installation view of Stephen Burrows: When Fashion Danced
    Museum of the City of New York
    March 22, 2013—July 28, 2013
    White lettuce edged chiffon billowed over the exhibition.
    Photo: Monique Long

  • Wrap Top Pants Suit, 1970s
    Jasco matte jersey, lettuce edge
    Label: Stephen Burrows’ World
    Photo: Monique Long

  • Coat, 1977
    Merrow-edged wool melton
    Label: Stephen Burrows’ World

  • Tunic Dress, 1977
    Natural chamois banded in gilt metallic snakeskin
    Label: Stephen Burrows’ World
    Photo: Monique Long

  • Burrows was a master draper who made sexy, fluid, body conscious ensembles that permitted no underpinnings whatsoever.
    Photo: Monique Long

  • A Stephen Burrows sketch with his signature lettuce edge.

  • Pat Cleveland, the designer's muse

A career retrospective of the fashion designer Stephen Burrows opened at the Museum of the City of New York this spring and has been the most current highlight in the over 40-year career of a designer who has seen many highlights.

Visualizing Historic Spaces Through Untitled (Structures)

A brief look into Untitled (Structures): Leslie Hewitt in collaboration with Bradford Young

  • Leslie Hewitt (b. 1977), in collaboration with Bradford Young (b. 1970)
    Untitled (Structures), 2012
    Courtesy the artists and Lucien Terras, Inc.

Former Studio Museum artist-in-residence and 2010 recipient of the Joyce Alexander Wein Prize, Leslie Hewitt (b. 1977) brings a fresh and dynamic perspective into how we visually experience our history in her new film installation, Untitled (Structures) (2012), at the Menil Collection in Houston.

Three Decades of Terry Adkins at the Tang

  • Installation view, Terry Adkins Recital, Tang Museum, 2012
    Upper-right: Darkwater Record, 2003-2008, recorders, bust, mixed media, installation dimensions variable, courtesy of the artist Lower-left: Still, 2000, steel, wood, glass, whiskey, 17 x 33 inches, Hood Museum of Art, Darthmouth College, purchased through the Guernsey Center Moore 1904 Fund; S.2003.39

Former Studio Museum in Harlem artist-in-residence, Terry Adkins, brings together thirty years of work for his new installation at the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY.

The works of art in Recital pay homage to the legacies of Bessie Smith, W. E. B. Du Bois, John Brown, Matthew Henson and John Coltrane, among others. Adkins’s creative research sheds light on lesser-known aspects of their biographies, such as Jimi Hendrix’s military training as a paratrooper in the 101st Airborne, or the question of Beethoven’s Moorish ancestry. In his sculpture, photography, and video, Adkins transforms and re-purposes a range of found materials, archival imagery, and reclaimed actions in a process that he calls potential disclosure.

Yinka Shonibare’s Message in a Bottle

Hybrid Citizen-Ship

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  • Yinka Shobinare
    Nelson's Ship in a Bottle, 2010
    Courtesy the artist and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London and James Cohan Gallery, New York. Photo: Stephen White 

  • Yinka Shobinare
    Nelson's Ship in a Bottle (detail), 2010.
    Photo: Katherine Finerty

  • National Maritime Museum Design Proposal
    Courtesy The National Maritime Museum
    © The Art Fund 2011

  • Ingar Dragset and Michael Elmgreen
    Powerless Structure, Fig 101, 2011
    Courtesy the artists and Fourth Plinth Commission.

Entering Trafalgar Square in London, it was nearly impossible to miss the curious installation of an impressive ship in a bottle. Placed atop the Fourth Plinth in front of the National Gallery from May 24th 2010 to last week, was the whimsically oversized model Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle (2010) by British Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare, MBE. Shonibare, celebrated for his potent, yet playful, post-colonial perspective and symbolic use of West African textiles, last exhibited at the Studio Museum in Harlem in a 2002 solo show. His recent site-specific sculpture across the pond was commissioned by the Mayor of London and Fourth Plinth Commissioning Group as part of a contemporary public art initiative.

Absorb/Diffuse

Jennie C. Jones at The Kitchen

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  • Absorb/Diffuse (Installation view) Photo: David Allison. Courtesy The Kitchen

  • Absorb/Diffuse (Installation view) Photo: David Allison. Courtesy The Kitchen

  • Absorb/Diffuse (Installation view) Photo: David Allison. Courtesy The Kitchen

  • Absorb/Diffuse (Installation view) Photo: David Allison. Courtesy The Kitchen

  • Absorb/Diffuse (Installation view) Photo: David Allison. Courtesy The Kitchen

  • Absorb/Diffuse (Installation view) Photo: David Allison. Courtesy The Kitchen

Fans of the Studio Museum's Studio Sound series will love Absorb/Diffuse, Jennie C. Jones's solo exhibition at The Kitchen that explores the mechanics of sound and how it is experienced. Curated by Matthew Lyons, the exhibition's focus is From the Low, an original score commissed by The Kitchen that Jones meticulously composed using samples culled from appropriated sources. Absorb/Diffuse also features Jones's Acoustic Paintings, mixed media works that combine soundproofing foam and other materials. The exhibition is currently on view but it ends October 29th so make sure to catch it before it closes!